Vote on Tuesday

Yesterday or today: a privilege, an expression of ideals and a civic responsibility

Voter instructions from 1898
Tomorrow’s election occasions a look back at elections past.  Whether yesterday or today, election officials put considerable effort into making the voting process accessible and secure.  The pictured 1898 State of Maine “Instructions to Voters” attest to a process not so different than today. One notable difference: the voters, election officials and candidates of today are both men and women… (thank you 19th amendment)…

1898: Give your name and ballot residence to the ballot Clerk
2018: Ditto
1898: Go alone to a ballot shelf and there unfold your ballot
2018: Ditto
1898: To vote a straight ticket, mark a cross X in the square over the party name at the top of the ticket.
2018: There is no square for a straight party ticket; vote for the candidate of your choice by filling in the oval to the right. To vote for a Write-in candidate, fill in the oval to the right of the Write-in space and write in the person’s name.
1898: To vote other than a straight party ticket, mark a cross X in the square over the party name, as if to vote a straight ticket, then below, in same column erase any name or names, and fill in the name or names of any candidate you choose in the space left for such purpose.
2018: Vote for the candidate of your choice by filling in the oval to the right. To vote for a Write-in candidate, fill in the oval to the right of the Write-in space and write in the person’s name. TO HAVE YOUR VOTE COUNT, DO NOT ERASE OR CROSS OUT ANY CHOICES — REQUEST A NEW BALLOT IF NEEDED.
1898: Mark a cross X in the square over Yes or No, where either of these words occur, as you desire to vote.
2018: To vote for a question, fill in the oval to the right of the YES or NO choice.
1898: Do not mark your ballot in any other way.
2018: Ditto
1898: If you spoil a ballot return it to the ballot clerk and he will give you another. You cannot have more than two extra ballots, or three in all.
2018: Ditto (but the ballot clerk may be a he or a she)
1898: You must mark your ballot in five minutes if other voters are waiting; you cannot remain within the rail more than ten minutes.
2018: There is no time limit.
1898: Before leaving the voting shelf, fold your ballot as it was folded when you received it and keep it so folded until you place it in the ballot box.
2018: There is no folding protocol; simply return all ballots that you were issued.
1898: Do not show anyone how you have marked your ballot.
2018: Ditto
1898: Go to the ballot box and give your name and residence to the warden or presiding election officers.
2018: Go to the ballot box and place all the ballots you were issued in the box.
1898: Put your folded ballot in the box with the Certificate of the Secretary of State uppermost and in sight.
2018: Just put your folded ballot(s) in the box.
1898: A voter who declares to the presiding officer or officers, (under oath if required), that he cannot read, or that he is physically unable to mark his ballot, shall, upon request, be assisted in the marking of his ballot by two of the election clerks, who shall be directed to so assist by the presiding election officer or officers.
2018: If you need help reading or marking the ballot, you may ask a relative or friend for assistance. The helper does not have to be a voter or old enough to vote. An election official can also help you read or mark a ballot. However, your employer or union official cannot help you vote. 

For Westport Island election information, see the Town website.

Posted on November 5, 2018, in History, News and tagged . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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